SEARCH

ASK ME ANYTHING

the freakin page

ABOUT

LINKS

victoriousvocabulary:

CHEILOPROCLITIC
[adjective/noun]
an erotic attraction to a person’s lips; one who is sexually attracted to a person’s lips.

victoriousvocabulary:

CHEILOPROCLITIC

[adjective/noun]

an erotic attraction to a person’s lips; one who is sexually attracted to a person’s lips.

(Source: eatsleepdraw)

ocularcanticle:

(via French Painters: Hippolyte FLANDRIN)
"French Painters" is a really fabulous blog that features, a couple times a week, a really large selection of work by a lesser known French artist, more often than not a 19th century French painter.
This painting in particular interested me because it was one of the only images amongst the paintings by Hippolyte Flandrin that was not rather frothy—you know what I mean, that tender, meticulously-executed style perfected by William Adolphe Bouguereau that, for all its beauty, seems (to my eye, anyway) curiously limp. This painting, however, was one blog commenter pointed out, seems out-of-place. This commenter as well as the blog’s author suggest that it may be unfinished, but it is not known for certain.
At any rate, I find it very striking, sort of menacing and lovely, like William Blake’s work. It is also wholly conceivable that it was on its way to becoming a polished and very pretty piece of salon art, but I’m rather glad it didn’t make it. As it is, it is a striking use of color and form: the featureless figure kneeling at Christ’s side, differentiated from the general murk of the sky only by the sun setting, and that color the same as Christ’s flesh, radiant even in death—it’s the most haunting Pieta work I’ve seen, unfinished or not. 

ocularcanticle:

(via French Painters: Hippolyte FLANDRIN)

"French Painters" is a really fabulous blog that features, a couple times a week, a really large selection of work by a lesser known French artist, more often than not a 19th century French painter.

This painting in particular interested me because it was one of the only images amongst the paintings by Hippolyte Flandrin that was not rather frothy—you know what I mean, that tender, meticulously-executed style perfected by William Adolphe Bouguereau that, for all its beauty, seems (to my eye, anyway) curiously limp. This painting, however, was one blog commenter pointed out, seems out-of-place. This commenter as well as the blog’s author suggest that it may be unfinished, but it is not known for certain.

At any rate, I find it very striking, sort of menacing and lovely, like William Blake’s work. It is also wholly conceivable that it was on its way to becoming a polished and very pretty piece of salon art, but I’m rather glad it didn’t make it. As it is, it is a striking use of color and form: the featureless figure kneeling at Christ’s side, differentiated from the general murk of the sky only by the sun setting, and that color the same as Christ’s flesh, radiant even in death—it’s the most haunting Pieta work I’ve seen, unfinished or not. 

asylum-art:

  ‘pictures of magazine 2vik muniz

vik muniz famous artworks recreated from torn magazines2’ brazilian artist  has extended his repertoire of unusual mediums in his artwork with a series entitled ‘pictures of magazine 2’the project is characterized by famous paintings recreated with outdated magazines that have been torn up and meticulously arranged to mimic the tones and contours of the original pieces.  Artworks are on exhibition at xippas gallery.

A bar at folies bergères,  after edouard manet

The Absinthe Drinker , after Edgar Degas

After the bath’, after Edgar Degas

Summer in the City, after Edward Hopp

Siesta, after Pierre Bonnard

Starry Night, after Van Gogh

Wanderer Above the Sea of Media, after Caspar David Friedrich

Wheat field with cypresses„ after Van Gogh

Floor scrapers,  after Gustave Caillebotte

Le zèbre, after George Stubbs

Odalisque With A Turkish Chair, after Henri Matisse




 


asylum-art:

Edie Nadelhaft

Edie Nadelhaft is a painter and sculptor based in New York, NY. She received an BFA in 1995 from Massachusetts College of Art, Boston.

In her two series “Flesh & Biters”, Edie uses her own hands and mouth as the subjects for her paintings. From close-up to extreme close-up, her detailed paintings of her hands explore the complexity of skin. The crisscrossing of millions of lines and the bulges of a clenched fist at such close angles turn the hand into a strange landscape.

Close ups of her mouth rendered with vivid colors of pink and white contrasts beautifully against deep cherry red creating a lusty undertone. The closeness of her painting have such an intensity, it almost feels like she’s chewing in your face while you look at them.

2headedsnake:

Hadas Patryk
'Greenbox (detail)'
oil on canvas

2headedsnake:

Hadas Patryk

'Greenbox (detail)'

oil on canvas